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The evolution of wilderness wildlife research in North America

Author(s):

R. Gerald Wright
Lisa K. Garrett

Year:

2000

Publication type:

Proceedings (P)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-3. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 50-60

Description

Most wildlife research in North America has focused on a standard suite of questions, asked of a limited assemblage of economically important species and studied using a relatively limited set of techniques, study site characteristics and narrow time-frames. We describe why these factors are not necessarily conducive to conducting wildlife research in wilderness settings. As a consequence, the amount of wildlife research conducted in wilderness settings has historically been small and limited primarily to wilderness-dependent species. We further describe the reasons for this, recent trends and the types of wildlife research questions that can best be addressed in wilderness settings.

Citation

Wright, R. Gerald; Garrett, Lisa K. 2000. The evolution of wilderness wildlife research in North America. In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 3: Wilderness as a place for scientific inquiry; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-3. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 50-60

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/21968