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    Author(s): Troy Hall; David N. Cole
    Date: 2000
    Source: In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-4. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 113-121
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (180 KB)

    Description

    Displacement has traditionally been defined as a process in which visitors cease using a recreation site because of sensitivity to crowding or other impacts. This study argues that such a definition is overly narrow: Displacement may also occur when those sensitive to regulation cease using a resource. Evidence for the two types of displacement was collected through self-administered surveys at three Oregon wilderness trailheads in 1991 and 1997. At two areas, use levels and impacts were high in both study periods. At the third, use limits were imposed in 1995, reducing the number of encounters but increasing regimentation. Data from both years on perceptions of crowding and other impacts, support for use limits and visitation patterns provide little evidence that crowding sensitive users were displaced from high-use destinations. There was substantial evidence that regulation-sensitive users were displaced by the new use limit system. These findings suggest that displacement of those sensitive to crowding may be less common than supposed, while displacement of visitors sensitive to regulation may be more common than previously believed. In high-use areas, some form of displacement is inevitable, and managers must clearly consider and justify which type of user they will displace.

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    Citation

    Hall, Troy; Cole, David N. 2000. An expanded perspective on displacement: A longitudinal study of visitors to two wildernesses in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. In: Cole, David N.; McCool, Stephen F.; Borrie, William T.; O’Loughlin, Jennifer, comps. 2000. Wilderness science in a time of change conference—Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management; 1999 May 23–27; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-15-VOL-4. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 113-121

    Keywords

    wilderness, displacement, impacts, crowding, Oregon

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