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    Author(s): Mirko Bunzel; John Ralph; Hoon Kim; Fachuang Lu; Sally A. Ralph; Jane M. Marita; Ronald D. Hatfield; Hans Steinhart
    Date: 2003
    Source: Journal of agricultural and food chemistry. Vol. 51, no. 5 (2003): pages 1427-1434.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (330 KB)

    Description

    Two 8-8-coupled sinapic acid dehydrodimers and at least three sinapate-ferulate heterodimers have been identified as saponification products from different insoluble and soluble cereal grain dietary fibers. The two 8-8-disinapates were authenticated by comparison of their GC retention times and mass spectra with authentic dehydrodimers synthesized from methyl or ethyl sinapate using two different single-electron metal oxidant systems. The highest amounts (481 μg/g) were found in wild rice insoluble dietary fiber. Model reactions showed that it is unlikely that the dehydrodisinapates detected are artifacts formed from free sinapic acid during the saponification procedure. The dehydrodisinapates presumably derive from radical coupling of sinapate-polymer esters in the cell wall; the radical coupling origin is further confirmed by finding 8-8 and 8-5 (and possibly 8-O-4) sinapate-ferulate cross-products. Sinapates therefore appear to have an analogous role to ferulates in cross-linking polysaccharides in cereal grains and presumably grass cell walls in general. Two 8-8-coupled sinapic acid dehydrodimers and at least three sinapate-ferulate heterodimers have been identified as saponification products from different insoluble and soluble cereal grain dietary fibers. The two 8-8-disinapates were authenticated by comparison of their GC retention times and mass spectra with authentic dehydrodimers synthesized from methyl or ethyl sinapate using two different single-electron metal oxidant systems. The highest amounts (481 μg/g) were found in wild rice insoluble dietary fiber. Model reactions showed that it is unlikely that the dehydrodisinapates detected are artifacts formed from free sinapic acid during the saponification procedure. The dehydrodisinapates presumably derive from radical coupling of sinapate-polymer esters in the cell wall; the radical coupling origin is further confirmed by finding 8-8 and 8-5 (and possibly 8-O-4) sinapate-ferulate cross-products. Sinapates therefore appear to have an analogous role to ferulates in cross-linking polysaccharides in cereal grains and presumably grass cell walls in general.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Bunzel, Mirko; Ralph, John; Kim, Hoon; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, Sally A.; Marita, Jane M.; Hatfield, Ronald D.; Steinhart, Hans. 2003. Sinapate dehydrodimers and sinapate−ferulate heterodimers in cereal dietary fiber. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry. Vol. 51, no. 5 (2003): pages 1427-1434.

    Keywords

    Zizania, Gramineae, wild rice, dietary fiber, hydroxycinnamic acid, sinapate, sinapic acid, dehydrodimer, ferulate, ferulic acid, radical coupling, cross-coupling, cell-wall cross-linking, single-electron oxidation, rice, grasses, mass spectrometry, hydroxycinnamic acid, cereals, dietary fiber, ferulate, dehydromers, heterodimers, fiber properties

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/22087