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    Author(s): Deborah Jean Lodge
    Date: 2002
    Source: Proceedings of the 5th Annual Caribbean Urban Forestry Conference : reflections of the past, visions of the future, May 22-25, 2000. [St. Croix, V.I.] : University of the Virgin Islands, Cooperative Extension Service, 2002: pages 168-170.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (154 KB)

    Description

    Although the majority of tree problems in urban setting are not caused by disease organisms, there are some current and potential disease threats in the Caribbean. Symptoms are the expression of stress in the plant. Symptoms may appear to be identical in response to many different types of diseases and physical or chemical damage. It is therefore helpful to determine the pattern of symptom in the field. Disease organisms rarely affect my different species, so a cluster of different unrelated plant species showing similar symptom is not likely to be caused by a fungal or bacterial disease. It is always best to look first for physical damage, cultural problem such as planting too deep, girdling roots and poisoning or salt stress (from wave overwash or fertilizers) before looking for disease problems since these may be the primary cause of symptoms or major contributing factors. If a disease is suspected, one should look for signs of a disease organism (for example, fruiting structures, mycelial fans or rootlike structures of a fungus). At the same time, one should try to localize the symptoms and the source of the problem (the symptoms may be localized leafspots; discoloration or death at the margins of the leaves, which indicates a problem below; confined to certain branches; localized on one side of the tree; or distributed throughout the tree).

    Publication Notes

    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Lodge, Deborah Jean, 1953- 2002. Recognizing and treating diseases in Caribbean trees. Proceedings of the 5th Annual Caribbean Urban Forestry Conference : reflections of the past, visions of the future, May 22-25, 2000. [St. Croix, V.I.] : University of the Virgin Islands, Cooperative Extension Service, 2002: pages 168-170.

    Keywords

    Tropical trees, disease control, pest control, fungal diseases of plants, phytopathogenic fungi, Caribbean area

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