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    Author(s): Michael D. MozuchPhilip J. Kersten
    Date: 2003
    Source: Thirty-fourth annual meeting of the International Research Group on Wood Preservation : 2003 May 18-23, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Stockholm, Sweden : IRG Secretariat, 2003: 5 pages.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (72 KB)

    Description

    Extracts of Phanerochaete chrysosporium cultures grown on birch or on a malt extract-peptone-glucose agar medium were analysed by HPLC. A major component from the two sources appears to be identical by HPLC and UV- visible spectrometry. The product isolated from agar-grown cultures was purified to apparent homogeneity and structure analysis by NMR indicates that the metabolite is the beta-resorcylate phanerosporic acid, consistent with previous characterizations. The possible role for the metabolite in wood metabolism is discussed.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Mozuch, Michael D.; Kersten, Philip J. 2003. Identification of phanerosporic acid in birch degraded by Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Thirty-fourth annual meeting of the International Research Group on Wood Preservation : 2003 May 18-23, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Stockholm, Sweden : IRG Secretariat, 2003: 5 pages.

    Keywords

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium, resorcylate, betulachrysoquinone, phanerosporic acid, wood-decaying fungi, yellow birch, Basidiomycetes, high performance liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance, fungal metabolites, cultures and culture media

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