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    Author(s): Ryan L. Maroney
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Bedunah, Donald J., McArthur, E. Durant, and Fernandez-Gimenez, Maria, comps. 2006. Rangelands of Central Asia: Proceedings of the Conference on Transformations, Issues, and Future Challenges. 2004 January 27; Salt Lake City, UT. Proceeding RMRS-P-39. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 37-49
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.1 MB)

    Description

    The number of protected areas in Mongolia has increased fourfold since the country’s transition to a market-based economy over a decade ago; however, many of these protected areas have yet to realize their intended role as protectorates of biodiversity. Given the prevalence of (semi-) nomadic pastoralists in rural areas, effective conservation initiatives in Mongolia will likely need to concurrently address issues of rangeland management and livelihood security. The case of argali management in western Mongolia is illustrative of a number of challenges facing protected areas management and wildlife conservation planning across the country. In this study, results from interviews with pastoralists in a protected area in western Mongolia indicate that local herders have a strong conservation ethic concerning the importance of protecting argali and are generally aware of and support government protections, but may not be inclined to reduce herd sizes or discontinue grazing certain pastures for the benefit of wildlife without compensation. Because past protectionist approaches to argali conservation in western Mongolia have not achieved effective habitat conservation or anti-poaching enforcement, alternative management strategies may be necessary. Results from this study suggest local receptiveness to integrated management programs incorporating processes of consensus building and collaboration to achieve pasture management and biodiversity conservation and providing direct local benefits.

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    Citation

    Maroney, Ryan L. 2006. Community based wildlife management planning in protected areas: The case of Altai argali in Mongolia. In: Bedunah, Donald J., McArthur, E. Durant, and Fernandez-Gimenez, Maria, comps. 2006. Rangelands of Central Asia: Proceedings of the Conference on Transformations, Issues, and Future Challenges. 2004 January 27; Salt Lake City, UT. Proceeding RMRS-P-39. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 37-49

    Keywords

    Community, argali, wildlife, management, conservation, Mongolia, Altai-Sayan

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/22867