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    Author(s): James G. Dickson; Frank R. Thompson; Richard N. Conner; Kathleen E. Franzreb
    Date: 1993
    Source: In: Finch, Deborah M.; Stangel, Peter W. (eds.). Status and management of neotropical migratory birds: September 21-25, 1992, Estes Park, Colorado. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-229. Fort Collins, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service: 374-385
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1023 KB)

    Description

    Avian communities that are associated with forest habitat attributes are affected by silvicultural and other stand influences. Some species have specific habitat requirements, whereas others occupy a broad range of vegetative conditions. In general, bird species richness and density are positively related to stand foliage volume and diversity. Bird density and diversity are usually high in young brushy stands, decrease in dense pole stands as canopies close and shade out understories, and are highest in older stands with diverse foliage strata. Tree harvesting generally favors early successional species such as the Indigo Bunting, Prairie Warbler, and Yellow-breasted Chat, but some late successional forest species, such as the Black-and-white Warbler, persist with partial cutting. A few forest interior species, such as the Ovenbird, are less abundant in landscapes with cutting and forest fragmentation. Some species may have elevated nest parasitism and nest predation along forest edges. Recommendations for NTMB include: Maintain some large, old-growth stands; manage foresf habitat for NTMB; employ special measures for endangered or sensitive species; implement long-term monitoring; and develop more complete information through research regarding NTMB, population viability, and their forest habitat.

    Central hardwood, loblolly-shortleaf pine, longleaf-slash-pine, and bottomland hardwood forests dominate the central and southeastern United States. These forests are managed by both even-aged and uneven-aged silvicultural systems. We review the impacts of silvicultural practices on neotropical migratory birds (NTMB), in forests of this region. We approach this topic by (1) identifying general relationships between birds and forest habitats and landscapes in the region, (2) assessing effects of forest management on the NTMB in each ecosystem, and (3) conclude with some management strategies that extend across forest types.

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    Citation

    Dickson, James G.; Thompson, Frank R.; Conner, Richard N.; Franzreb, Kathleen E. 1993. Effects of silviculture on neotropical migratory birds in central and southeastern oak pine forests. In: Finch, Deborah M.; Stangel, Peter W. (eds.). Status and management of neotropical migratory birds: September 21-25, 1992, Estes Park, Colorado. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-229. Fort Collins, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service: 374-385

    Keywords

    migratory birds, habitats, silvicultural systems, forest management, species richness

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