Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): C. R. Groves; J. W. Unsworth
    Date: 1993
    Source: In: Finch, Deborah M.; Stangel, Peter W. (eds.). Status and management of neotropical migratory birds: September 21-25, 1992, Estes Park, Colorado. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-229. Fort Collins, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service: 408-417
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station
    PDF: View PDF  (933 KB)

    Description

    The primary concern of wildlife managers in the USDA Forest Service (USFS) and ldaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) is maintaining elk herds and quality elk hunting. As a result, nongame species like neotropical migratory landbirds do not receive much management attention. Cause for concern over this neglect are twofold: 1) forest fragmentation may be having detrimental effects on neotropical migrants in ldaho and 2) an emphasis on elk habitat management may not be in the best interests of achieving the broader goal of maintaining biological diversity on National Forest lands. We discuss biological, policy, economic, and political implications for neotropical migrants on USFS lands managed primarily for elk. Our analysis proceeds from a review of forest plans, a review of IDFG comments on these plans, interviews with USFS and IDFG biologists, and a synthesis of literature on the ecology of elk and neotropical migrants. Elk are inappropriately used as an ecological management indicator species because they are habitat generalists. The use of MIS and models to manage habitat for elk (habitat effectiveness models) are reviewed and critiqued. The extent to which forest fragmentation, to which elk appear well-adapted, may be negatively impacting neotropical migrants is discussed. A landscape-level approach for managing habitats for neotropical migrants is broadly outlined. We give recommendations for improving management of elk and neotropical migrants, and for improving individual and collective abilities of USFS and IDFG wildlife personnel for management of all wildlife species on USFS lands in Idaho.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Groves, C. R.; Unsworth, J. W. 1993. Wapiti and warblers: integrating game and nongame management in Idaho. In: Finch, Deborah M.; Stangel, Peter W. (eds.). Status and management of neotropical migratory birds: September 21-25, 1992, Estes Park, Colorado. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-229. Fort Collins, Colo.: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service: 408-417

    Keywords

    migratory birds, habitat fragmentation, wildlife management, Idaho

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/22926