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    Author(s): Steven W. Burr; David Scott
    Date: 2004
    Source: In: Proceedings of the Fourth Social Aspects and Recreation Research Symposium; 2004 February 4-6; San Francisco, California. San Francisco State University. 204-211
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (55.0 KB)

    Description

    The growth of birdwatching over the last two decades has been staggering. According to the recent National Survey of Recreation and the Environment (NSRE) (2000-2002), one-third (33%) of American adults said they went birdwatching at least once during the previous 12 months. According to NSRE data, the number of people who regarded themselves as birdwatchers increased 27% between 1995 and 2001 and an incredible 225% between 1982 and 1991. Although most people watch birds exclusively in their yards, 40% of birdwatchers leave their homes to look at birds (U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, 2002). The economic impacts of birdwatching are remarkable as well, with thousands of birders visiting birding “hotspots” and collectively spending millions of dollars during such outings, resulting in significant economic benefits locally (Crandall, Leones, & Colby, 1992; Kerlinger & Wiedner, 1994; Kim, Scott, Thigpen, & Kim, 1997; Eubanks, Kerlinger, & Payne, 1993). This has spurred community development and conservation leaders to develop festivals and special events attractive to birdwatchers. Today, there are approximately 200 birdwatching and wildlife-watching festivals held throughout the United States and Canada (American Birding Association, 2001). One of these is the Great Salt Lake Bird Festival, which was established in 1999 and has experienced growth over the years in the number of visitors attending, with approximately 3,000 visitors attending in 2002 and 3,500 attending in 2003 (N. Roundy, personal communication, July 15, 2003).

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    Citation

    Burr, Steven W.; Scott, David. 2004. Understanding Great Salt Lake Bird Festival Visitors: Applying the Recreational Specialization Framework. In: Proceedings of the Fourth Social Aspects and Recreation Research Symposium; 2004 February 4-6; San Francisco, California. San Francisco State University. 204-211

    Keywords

    birdwatching, nsre

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