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    Author(s): Mary F. Mahalovich
    Date: 1995
    Source: In: L.G. Eskew, comp. Forest health through silviculture: proceedings of the 1995 National Silviculture Workshop, Mescalero, New Mexico, May 8-11, 1995. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-267. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 200-207
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station
    PDF: View PDF  (598 KB)

    Description

    An often ignored tool to improve forest health is the application of genetics-Tree improvement programs in the Inland West utilize genetic principles to develop-seed transfer guidelines to avoid the problems associated with off-site plantings and to improve characteristics in conifers related to forest health. PC-based expert systems have been developed to aid in seed transfer in ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir. Genetic gains in adaptation, and insect and disease resistance, continue to be made in western white pine, western larch, ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and lodgepole pine. While progress has been made in the white pine blister rust program, restoring western white pine to Inland Northwest forests requires a continued commitment to selective breeding. Other insect and disease problems should also receive strong consideration in selective breeding programs, to prevent erosion of existing genetic resistance, and when warranted, to sustain and enhance this resistance.

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    Citation

    Mahalovich, Mary F. 1995. The role of genetics in improving forest health. In: L.G. Eskew, comp. Forest health through silviculture: proceedings of the 1995 National Silviculture Workshop, Mescalero, New Mexico, May 8-11, 1995. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-267. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station: 200-207

    Keywords

    forest health, genetics, insects, diseases, selective breeding, seed transfer

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