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Experiencing limits of acceptable change: some thoughts after a decade of implementation

Author(s):

Stephen F. McCool

Year:

1997

Publication type:

General Technical Report (GTR)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Historical Station(s):

Intermountain Forest Experiment Station

Source:

In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N., comps. Proceedings - limits of acceptable change and related planning processes: progress and future directions: from a workshop held at the University of Montana's Lubrecht Experimental Forest. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-371. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station: 72-78

Description

Wilderness managers and researchers have experienced implementation of the Limits of Acceptable Change planning system for over a decade. In a sense, implementation of LAC has been a broad scale experiment in planning, with the hypothesis being that LAC processes are more effective approaches to deal with questions of recreation management in protected areas than the carrying capacity paradigm. Workshop participants identified a number of both positive and negative consequences resulting from their experience with LAC. This paper synthesizes these outcomes by discussing the positive results, describing the problems encountered, and outlining lessons learned.

Citation

McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N. 1997. Experiencing limits of acceptable change: some thoughts after a decade of implementation. In: McCool, Stephen F.; Cole, David N., comps. Proceedings - limits of acceptable change and related planning processes: progress and future directions: from a workshop held at the University of Montana''s Lubrecht Experimental Forest. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-371. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station: 72-78

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/23913