Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Lisa HolsingerRobert E. Keane; Brian Steele; Matthew C. Reeves; Sarah Pratt
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Rollins, Matthew G.; Frame, Christine K., tech. eds. 2006. The LANDFIRE Prototype Project: nationally consistent and locally relevant geospatial data for wildland fire management Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-175. Fort Collins: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 315-366.
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (4.9 MB)

    Description

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Prototype Project, or LANDFIRE Prototype Project, was conceived, in part, to identify areas across the nation where existing landscape conditions are markedly different from historical conditions (Keane and Rollins, Ch. 3). This objective arose from the recognition that over 100 years of land use and wildland fire suppression have dramatically affected wildfire characteristics and associated landscape composition, structure, and function (Turner and others 2001). Metrics were needed to describe the extent and distribution of highly departed landscapes to protect communities, ecosystems, firefighters, and public safety, as outlined in the National Fire Plan (USDA and USDI 2002; U.S. GAO 1999). Accordingly, the Departments of Agriculture and Interior were directed by Congress to develop a cohesive strategy for implementing the National Fire Plan (Laverty and Williams 2000), which resulted in the development of the “Fire Regime Condition Class” (FRCC) classification system for use as a key implementation measure. The FRCC classification is based on the concepts of historical ecology and is intended to represent the departure of current landscapes from the range of variability of historical conditions. Fire Regime Condition Class is defined as: a descriptor of the amount of departure from the historical natural regimes, possibly resulting in alterations of key ecosystem components such as species composition, structural stage, stand age, canopy closure, and fuel loadings (Hann and Bunnell 2001).

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Holsinger, Lisa; Keane, Robert E.; Steele, Brian; Reeves, Matthew C.; Pratt, Sarah 2006. Using historical simulations of vegetation to assess departure of current vegetation conditions across large landscapes[Chapter 11]. In: Rollins, Matthew G.; Frame, Christine K., tech. eds. 2006. The LANDFIRE Prototype Project: nationally consistent and locally relevant geospatial data for wildland fire management Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-175. Fort Collins: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 315-366.

    Keywords

    mapping wildland fuel, mapping fire regimes, Geographic Information Systems, GIS, remote sensing, fire ecology, fire behavior, wildland fire management

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page