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    Author(s): Richard A. Werner; Kenneth F. Raffa; Barbara L. Illman
    Date: 2006
    Source: Alaska's changing boreal forest. Oxford : New York : Oxford University Press, 2006. Long-term Ecological Research Network series: Pages [133]-146.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (93 KB)

    Description

    Boreal forests support an array of insects, including phytophagous (plant-eating) insects, saprophagous (detritus-eating) insects, and their associated parasites, predators, and symbionts. The phytophagous species include folivorous leaf chewers and miners, phloeophagous cambial and sapwood borers, stem gallers, and root feeders. Biological diversity and distribution of insect species exhibit predictable patterns among vegetation types (Werner 1994a). In this chapter, we discuss how phytophagous species of insects differ among plant communities and how various populations of insects react to disturbances that alter forest stand composition and density.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Werner, Richard A.; Raffa, Kenneth F.; Illman, Barbara L. 2006. Dynamics of phytophagous insects and their pathogens in Alaskan boreal forests. Alaska''s changing boreal forest. Oxford : New York : Oxford University Press, 2006. Long-term Ecological Research Network series: Pages [133]-146.

    Keywords

    Insect communities, insect ecology, insect pests, phytopathogenic fungi, taigas, insects as carriers of disease, species diversity, boreal forests, diseases and pests, Alaska

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