Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Thomas Zimmerman; Michael Frary; Shelly Crook; Brett Fay; Patricia Koppenol; Richard Lasko
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 47-58
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (280 B)

    Description

    The application and use of wildland fire for a range of beneficial ecological objectives is rapidly expanding across landscapes supporting diverse vegetative complexes and subject to multiple societal uses. Wildland fire use originated in wilderness and has become a proven practice successful in meeting ecological needs. The use of wildland fire in non-wilderness is emerging as an important practice but its success is predicated on the acknowledgment of the fundamental inseparability and equal importance of ecological, social, and economic needs and requirements. The 2005 western fire season resulted in the single largest scale application of wildland fire use in non-wilderness to date and illustrated that managing wildland fire use in these areas is associated with a higher level of complexity driven by a number of elements including: spatial scale differences; presence of multiple ownerships and increased values to be protected; increased needs to plan and implement mitigation actions; temporal scale differences for implementing mitigation actions; greater social and economic concerns and needs; and increased public information needs. Continuing expansion of wildland fire use implementation across federal, state, and private land ownerships and all land use situations will encounter additional influences and new challenges, situations not previously experienced, and ancillary implementation questions which could potentially limit program growth and development.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Zimmerman, Thomas; Frary, Michael; Crook, Shelly; Fay, Brett; Koppenol, Patricia; Lasko, Richard 2006. Wildland Fire Use - Challenges Associated With Program Management Across Multiple Ownerships and Land Use Situations. In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 47-58

    Keywords

    fire, fire ecology, fuels management, program management, multiple ownerships, land use, wildland fire

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page