Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Eric Toman; Bruce Shindler
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 715-728
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (230 B)

    Description

    Current wildland fire policy calls for citizen involvement in planning and management. To be effective in their efforts to engage outside stakeholders, resource professionals need to understand citizens’ understanding and attitudes toward current practices as well as how to best communicate about proposed actions. A variety of outreach methods have been used to communicate the rationale behind fuel reduction techniques. Limited evaluation of these efforts has occurred resulting in a lack of information available to guide the outreach decisions of agency personnel. This paper evaluates the effects of two basic communication strategies - unidirectional information exchange and interactive approaches - on participant understanding and attitudes. Data was collected in two phases; first, citizens completed a survey on-site prior to outreach participation, then, a follow-up questionnaire was mailed to each participant two weeks following initial contact. Resulting data enable assessment of the influence of outreach activities on participant understanding and attitudes and evaluation of factors that contributed to program success. Findings suggest interactive outreach methods may be more effective at influencing knowledge. However, unidirectional and interactive approaches influenced participants with low initial understanding of fire management or less supportive attitudes toward fuel practices. Results also showed a strong association between knowledge and attitude change suggesting fire professionals have a real opportunity to help shape public perceptions about appropriate management actions.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce 2006. Communicating the wildland fire message: Influences on knowledge and attitude change in two case studies. In: Andrews, Patricia L.; Butler, Bret W., comps. 2006. Fuels Management-How to Measure Success: Conference Proceedings. 28-30 March 2006; Portland, OR. Proceedings RMRS-P-41. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 715-728

    Keywords

    fire, fire ecology, fuels management, wildland fire, outreach methods, fuel reduction techniques, unidirectional information exchange, interactive approaches

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page