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    Author(s): John Paul Schmit
    Date: 2005
    Source: Fungal community : its organization and role in the ecosystem. Boca Raton, FL : Taylor & Francis, 2005: ISBN: 0824723554: 9780824723552: pages 193-214.
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (373 KB)

    Description

    In this chapter, we examine the use of classical methods to study fungal diversity. Classical methods rely on the direct observation of fungi, rather than sampling fungal DNA. We summarize a wide variety of classical methods, including direct sampling of fungal fruiting bodies, incubation of substrata in moist chambers, culturing of endophytes, and particle plating. We also cite and discuss study designs for documenting diversity and monitoring species, and analytical methods that have been used for data produced using classical methods. Selected examples of such mycological studies are cited so they may serve as models for future research.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Schmit, John Paul 2005. Classical methods and modern analysis for studying fungal diversity. Fungal community : its organization and role in the ecosystem. Boca Raton, FL : Taylor & Francis, 2005: ISBN: 0824723554: 9780824723552: pages 193-214.

    Keywords

    Fungi, cultures and culture media, sampling, methodology, species diversity, ecology, fungal communities, mycological surveys, culture methods

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