Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Lori L. Valentine; Tina L. Fiedler; Stephen R. Haney; Harold K. Berninghausen; Darlene Southworth
    Date: 2002
    Source: In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California's Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 151-157
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (700 KB)

    Description

    Garry oak or Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana) is the dominant vegetation on the Whetstone Savanna in Jackson County, Oregon. The site is located on the western edge of the Agate Desert, an alluvial fan capped with shallow clay loam over a cemented hardpan. The landform exhibits patterned ground with mounds and vernal pools. The oaks are associated with buck brush (Ceanothus cuneatus) and with native and exotic grasses. In preparation for a study of the biocomplexity of common mycorrhizal networks among oaks and grasses, we examined the mycorrhizal morphotypes on Garry oak. We sampled soil cores at distances half way to the canopy edge, at the canopy edge, and outside the canopy and have identified over 40 ectomycorrhizal morphotypes including Cenococcum geophilum. Infection rates on oak roots were lowest on trees growing in or near vernal pools and highest on oaks growing in groves with closed canopies. Using the fungal specific primers ITS1-F and ITS4 and the restriction enzymes HinfI and TaqI, we amplified DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare ectomycorrhizal morphotypes. Small differences in mycorrhizal morphology correlated with differences in restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns, suggesting that there were many different species. We also observed the unusual occurrence of endomycorrhizas with intraradical hyphae and vesicles in oak roots.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to psw_communications@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Valentine, Lori L.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Haney, Stephen R.; Berninghausen, Harold K.; Southworth, Darlene. 2002. Biodiversity of mycorrhizas on Garry oak (Quercus garryana) in a southern Oregon savanna. In: Standiford, Richard B., et al, tech. editor. Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Oaks in California''s Challenging Landscape. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-184, Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 151-157

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/26118