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    Author(s): David J. NowakRobert HoehnJeffrey T. WaltonDaniel E. CraneJack C. Stevens; Daniel Twardus; Anne Cumming; Manfred Mielke; Bill Smith
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 181-187
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (460 B)

    Description

    Trees in cities can contribute significantly to human health and environmental quality. Unfortunately, little is known about the urban forest resource and what it contributes to the local, regional, and national societal and economic interests. To help better understand the urban forest resource and its numerous values, the USDA Forest Service has initiated a pilot program to sample urban forests and street tree populations across various states. Pilot tests of monitoring the total tree population in urban areas have been or are being conducted in Indiana, Wisconsin, and New Jersey. Pilot tests of monitoring state-wide street tree populations have been conducted in Maryland, Wisconsin, and Massachusetts. Results from the pilot studies include information on urban forest population size and composition, health, potential risk from insects and disease, and various forest functions (for example, carbon storage, air pollution removal, building energy conservation) and values. Results from the pilot study in Indiana reveal that there are approximately 92.7 million urban trees ($55.7 billion structural value) and that these trees removed about 6,600 metric tons of air pollution in 2000 ($53.4 million value) and store about 8.4 million metric tons of carbon ($170.2 million value).These base values provide insight into urban forest structure, functions, and tree health to aid in urban forest planning and management. Through long-term monitoring of these plots, critical information can be obtained to assess how this resource is changing.

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    Citation

    Nowak, David J.; Hoehn, Robert; Walton, Jeffrey T.; Crane, Daniel E.; Stevens, Jack C.; Twardus, Daniel; Cumming, Anne; Mielke, Manfred; Smith, Bill. 2006. Urban Forest Health Monitoring in the United States. In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 181-187

    Keywords

    monitoring, assessment, sustainability, Western Hemisphere, sustainable management, ecosystem resources, urban forest health monitoring

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/26406