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    Author(s): Thomas A. Spies; Jon R. Martin
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 242-245
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (300 B)

    Description

    The era of ecosystem management for federal forest lands in the Pacific Northwest began in 1994 with the adoption of the Northwest Forest Plan. This plan was designed to maintain and restore species and ecosystems associated with late successional and old-growth forests on over 10 million ha. of federal lands in Washington, Oregon and California. The plan called for implementation monitoring, effectiveness monitoring, and validation monitoring for a variety of ecological and socio-economic components. Monitoring has become a central part of management of the federal forests in the region and managers and scientists have gained considerable experience in implementing this large and complex program. The components of the monitoring plan include, late-successional/old growth vegetation, northern spotted owls, marbled murrelets, aquatic habitat and social conditions. The monitoring plan is strongly based on vegetation layer created with TM satellite imagery and on a regional grid of forest inventory plots. The lessons learned from the implementation of this monitoring plan include: 1) agencies need to devote considerable resources to insure that effective monitoring will occur at broad scales; 2) aggregation of local monitoring efforts is not a substitute for a designed regional monitoring plan; 3) vegetation structure and composition, measured with satellite imagery and inventory plots, is a cost effective, broad-scale indicator of biological diversity; 4) Some species, such as threatened and endangered species, are not necessarily covered with habitat approaches and may require population monitoring; 5) our scientific understanding of monitoring components will vary widely as will the approaches to data collection and analysis; 6) monitoring requires research support to develop and test metrics and biodiversity models; 7) Links of monitoring to decision making (adaptive management) are still being forged.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Spies, Thomas A.; Martin, Jon R. 2006. Monitoring late-successional forest biodiversity in the Pacific Northwest, U.S.A. In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 242-245

    Keywords

    monitoring, assessment, sustainability, Western Hemisphere, sustainable management, ecosystem resources, Pacific Northwest, Northwest Forest Plan

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/26415