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Linking vegetation patterns to potential smoke production and fire hazard

Author(s):

Ernesto Alvarado

Year:

2004

Publication type:

General Technical Report (GTR)

Primary Station(s):

Pacific Southwest Research Station

Source:

In: Murphy, Dennis D. and Stine, Peter A., editors. Proceedings of the Sierra Nevada Science Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 93-96

Description

During the past 80 years, various disturbances (such as wildfire and wind events) and management actions (including fire exclusion, logging, and domestic livestock grazing) have significantly modified the composition and structure of forests and ranges across the western United States. The resulting fuel loadings directly influence potential smoke production from wildland and prescribed fires and affect the vulnerability of landscapes to extreme fire behavior and crown fires. Assessments of potential smoke production and tradeoffs in air quality and fire hazard relative to managed fire and wildfire during large landscape assessments are essential to inform stakeholders involved in landscape-level decision making.

Citation

Ottmar, Roger D.; Alvarado, Ernesto. 2004. Linking vegetation patterns to potential smoke production and fire hazard. In: Murphy, Dennis D. and Stine, Peter A., editors. Proceedings of the Sierra Nevada Science Symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 93-96

Publication Notes

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/26478