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    Author(s): Efren Hernandez-Alvarez; Dieter R. Pelz; Carlos Rodriguez Franco
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 638-648
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: Download Publication  (1.4 MB)

    Description

    Tropical dry forests in Mexico are an outstanding natural resource, due to the large surface area they cover. This ecosystem can be found from Baja California Norte to Chiapas on the eastern coast of the country. On the Gulf of Mexico side it grows from Tamaulipas to Yucatan. This is an ecosystem that is home to a wide diversity of plants, which include 114 tree species. These species lose their leaves for long periods of time during the year. This plant community prospers at altitudes varying from sea level up to 1700 meters, in a wide range of soil conditions. Studies regarding land attributes with full identification of tree species are scarce in Mexico. However, documenting the tree species composition of this ecosystem, and the environment conditions where it develops is good beginning to assess the diversity that can be found there. A geographical information system overlapping 4 layers of information was applied to define ecological units as a basic element that combines a series of homogeneous biotic and environmental factors that define specific growing conditions for several plant species. These ecological units were sampled to document tree species diversity in a land track of 4662 ha, known as “Arroyo Cuenca la Quebrada” located at Tomatlan, Jalisco. This paper will describe and discuss the methodology used for the study, the results obtained for three plant strata, the number of families found, the number of genera per family, and the number of species per family by Ecological Unit, and it will describe a follow up plan for monitoring this vegetation. This research was supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT), México, Project: 31808-B.

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    Citation

    Hernandez-Alvarez, Efren; Pelz, Dieter R.; Franco, Carlos Rodriguez. 2006. Inventorying and Monitoring of Tropical Dry Forests Tree Diversity in Jalisco, Mexico Using a Geographical Information System. In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 638-648

    Keywords

    monitoring, assessment, sustainability, Western Hemisphere, sustainable management, ecosystem resources, tropical dry forests, Mexico, tree diversity

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/26551