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    Author(s): S. Salazar; M. Mendoza; A. M. Tejeda
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 871-874
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (340 B)

    Description

    A spatial model is presented to explain the concentration of heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Co and Pb), in the soils around the industrial complex near the Port of Veracruz, Mexico. Unexpected low concentration sites where then tested to detect woody plant species that may have the capability to hiperacumulate these contaminants, hence having a potential for dendroremediation.

    The study case circumstances are conducive to test this hypothesis because of the radial nature of the industrial sprawl, and the rural surroundings, where low presence of heavy metals is expected. Contaminants selected are common in the sort of industrial outfits in the region, most of which are involved in metal manufacturing.

    Results show levels of Cu, Zn, Cr, Co, and Pb in soils exceeding the reference threshold concentration in a fanshaped pattern downwind, with peak values for Fe. At least four species had no damage symptoms: guácimo, Guazuma ulmifolia; roble, Tadelobuia pentaphylla L., cocuite, Gliricidia sepium and palo mulato, Bursela simaruba L. This suggests these materials are resistant to metal pollution at the concentration levels seen in the region.

    Analysis of woody and bark tissue is underway, and it is expected to confirm the potential of the four species as pollutant accumulators suitable for bioremediation. If such were the case, they should they be propagated and placed all through out the downwind side of the industrial complex in a large scale trial. The up wind concentrations were not a concern from the point of view of environmental regulations, and the effect of accumulator species already present resulted not statistically significant, except cocuite.

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    Citation

    Salazar, S.; Mendoza, M.; Tejeda, A. M. 2006. Spatial Modeling of Industrial Windfall on Soils to Detect Woody Species with Potential for Bioremediation. In: Aguirre-Bravo, C.; Pellicane, Patrick J.; Burns, Denver P.; and Draggan, Sidney, Eds. 2006. Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium: Unifying Knowledge for Sustainability in the Western Hemisphere Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 871-874

    Keywords

    monitoring, assessment, sustainability, Western Hemisphere, sustainable management, ecosystem resources, spatial modeling, soils, bioremediation, spatial model, Veracruz, Mexico

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