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    Author(s): Kristen M. Waring; Kevin L. O'Hara
    Date: 2006
    Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Shea, Patrick J.; and Haverty, Michael I., tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-196. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 187-189
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (21 KB)

    Description

    Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) frequently grows in association with tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) along the central and northern California coast. High rates of tanoak mortality beginning in the mid 1990’s have been attributed to Phytophthora ramorum, a water mold believed to be non-native. Of the many species that host P. ramorum, tanoak is one of the most susceptible and thousands of tanoak trees have died in the past ten years. In a two species forest, the implications of losing one species may be severe, especially when one species is a mast producer such as tanoak. These trees provide numerous ecological benefits, many of which have yet to be quantified. Tanoak has long been classified as a weed by the timber industry because of its ability to colonize and re-sprout following disturbance. For this reason, tanoak is frequently the target of vegetation control treatments using herbicides to reduce competition with the commercially valuable redwood trees. Tanoak does have considerable ecological value as the only mast-producing species in redwood/tanoak forests. Development patterns in redwood/tanoak forest stands have not been quantified, nor has the response pattern of residual trees following invasion of a stand by P. ramorum. The objectives of this study were to quantify stand development patterns in redwood/tanoak stands, assess residual tree response to tanoak decline and mortality, and develop guidelines for restoration and management of affected stands.

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    Citation

    Waring, Kristen M.; O''Hara, Kevin L. 2006. Residual tree response to tanoak decline in California. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Shea, Patrick J.; and Haverty, Michael I., tech. coords. Proceedings of the sudden oak death second science symposium: the state of our knowledge. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-196. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 187-189

    Keywords

    sudden oak death, redwood, tanoak, stand development, tree response

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/26617