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    Author(s): J. Brian Mudd
    Date: 1998
    Source: In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 3-10
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (180 KB)

    Description

    Plants react biochemically to ozone in three phases: with constitutive chemicals in the apoplastic fluid and cell membranes; by forming messenger molecules by the affected constitutive materials (ethylene); and by responding to the messenger molecules with pathogenic RNAs and proteins. For instance, plant reactions with ozone result in constitutive molecules such as the ozonolysis of ethylene in the gas spaces of the leaf, and the reaction with ascorbic acid in the apoplastic fluid. Formation of messenger molecules include the stimulation of ethylene production. Responses to the messenger molecules include the formation of the pathogen related proteins and their mRNAs. Reactions of ozone with biological molecules also frequently result in classical ozonolysis of double bonds, with the production of various aldehydes and peroxides, such as ethylene, isoprene, fatty acids, tryptophan, and some phenylpropenoic acids. Some reactions of ozone with biological molecules do not fit the classical ozonolysis mechanism, such as the oxidation of methionine and some phenylpropenoic acids.

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    Citation

    Mudd, J. Brian. 1998. Biochemical reactions of ozone in plants. In: Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Arbaugh, Michael J.; Schilling, Susan L., tech. coords. Proceedings of the international symposium on air pollution and climate change effects on forest ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-166. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station: 3-10

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/26949