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Invasion Genetics of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis FAIRMAIRE) in North America

Year:

2007

Publication type:

Proceedings (P)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Source:

In: Bentz, Barbara; Cognato, Anthony; Raffa, Kenneth, eds. Proceedings from the Third Workshop on Genetics of Bark Beetles and Associated Microorganisms. Proc. RMRS-P-45. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 21-22

Description

Emerald ash borer (EAB) was first detected in Michigan and Canada in 2002. Efforts by federal and state regulatory agencies to control this destructive pest have been challenged by the biology of the pest and the speed in which it has spread. Invasion dynamics of the beetle and identifying source populations from Asia may help identify geographic localities of potential biocontrol agents. Genetic techniques, such as mtDNA gene sequencing, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP), nuclear gene sequencing, and microsatellite analysis will help determine the geographic origin of the native east Asian population(s) of EAB that have given rise to the EAB that is invasive in North America.

Citation

Bray, Alicia M.; Bauer, Leah S.; Haack, Robert A.; Poland, Therese; Smith, James J. 2007. Invasion Genetics of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis FAIRMAIRE) in North America. In: Bentz, Barbara; Cognato, Anthony; Raffa, Kenneth, eds. Proceedings from the Third Workshop on Genetics of Bark Beetles and Associated Microorganisms. Proc. RMRS-P-45. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 21-22

Publication Notes

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/27363