Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): George A. James; Harold K. Cordell
    Date: 1970
    Source: Res. Note SE-130. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 5 p.
    Publication Series: Research Note (RN)
    Station: Southeastern Forest Experiment Station
    PDF: View PDF  (298 KB)

    Description

    Campers at Indian Boundary Campground in Tenr.essee were interviewed during 1966 and 1967 to determine the amount of shading they preferred. The overstory in this campground was selectively thinned several years earlier. This gave campers a choice of campsites, ranging from those so heavily shaded that little sunlight reached the forest floor to campsites that reaeived almost full sunlight. Many visitors to the campground reported that degree of shade was important in their selection of campsites, and many inidcated that they want some copromise between full shade and full sunlight. Study findings indicate that recreation managers and planners should examine the current design standard that advocates little or no tree cutting in developed campgrounds.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to pubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    James, George A.; Cordell, Harold K. 1970. Importance of Shading to Visitors Selecting a Campsite at Indian Boundary Campground in Tennessee. Res. Note SE-130. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 5 p.

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page