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    Author(s): Jonathan Thompson
    Date: 2007
    Source: Science Findings 94. Portland, OR. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 5 p
    Publication Series: Science Findings
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (896.0 KB)

    Description

    Mountain meadows in the Pacific Northwest are patches of remarkable biological diversity. Lush, forb-, grass-, and shrub-dominated communities attract rich assemblages of arthropods, support diverse communities of birds, and provide habitat for small mammals and other wildlife. Recent encroachment by conifers has reduced the extent and ecological integrity of meadows, with consequences for their biota, scenic values, and recreational use. Using a diversity of approaches, researchers and managers are attempting to unravel the causes and consequences of encroachment and the potential for maintaining or restoring these important habitats.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Thompson, Jonathan. 2007. Mountain meadows—here today, gone tomorrow? Meadow science and restoration. Science Findings 94. Portland, OR. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 5 p

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