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The use of fire in forest restoration

Author(s):

Stephen F. Arno

Year:

1996

Publication type:

General Technical Report (GTR)

Primary Station(s):

Rocky Mountain Research Station

Historical Station(s):

Intermountain Forest Experiment Station

Source:

Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-341. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 86 p.

Description

The 26 papers in this document address the current knowledge of fire as a disturbance agent, fire history and fire regimes, applications of prescribed fire for ecological restoration, and the effects of fire on the various forested ecosystems of the north-western United States. The main body of this document is organized in three sections: Assessing Needs for Fire in Restoration; Restoration of Fire in Inland Forests; and Restoration in Pacific Westside Forests. These papers comprise the proceedings from a general technical conference at the 1995 Annual Meeting of the Society for Ecological Restoration, held at the University of Washington, Seattle, September 14-16, 1995.

The seminal role of fire in ecosystem management-impetus for this publication
Restoring fire to ecosystems: Methods vary with land management goals
Fire regimes and approaches for determining fire history
Coarse-scale restoration planning and design in Interior Columbia River Basin ecosystems: An example for restoring declining whitebark pine forests
Dynamically incorporating late-successional forest in sustainable landscapes
Smoke considerations for using fire in maintaining healthy forest ecosystems
Restoration of fire in National Parks
The role of fire in Research Natural Areas in the Northern Rockies and Pacific Northwest
The concept: Restoring ecological structure and process in ponderosa pine forests
Silvicultural applications: Restoring ecological structure and process in ponderosa pine forests
Prescribed fire applications: Restoring ecological structure and process in ponderosa pine forests
Reestablishing fire-adapted communities to riparian forests in the ponderosa pine zone
Restoring recreational and residential forests
Determination of fire-initiated landscape patterns: Restoring fire mosaics on the landscape
Restoring historic landscape patterns through management: Restoring fire mosaics on the landscape
Whitebark pine ecosystem restoration in western Montana
Examples of fire restoration in Glacier National Park
Dealing with public concerns in restoring fire to the forest
Fire history and landscape restoration in Douglas-fir ecosystems of western Oregon
Forests of the Oregon Coast Range-considerations for ecological restoration
Fire in restoration of Oregon white oak woodlands
Fire regimes and restoration needs in southwest Oregon
Restoring fire to mixed conifer forests in the Northern Cascades
Applying stand replacement prescribed fires in Alaska
Integrating fire management into land management planning for west-side forests
Can we restore the fire process? What awaits us if we don't?

Citation

Hardy, Colin C.; Arno, Stephen F., eds. 1996. The use of fire in forest restoration. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-341. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Research Station. 86 p.

Cited

Publication Notes

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  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/27534