Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): George J. Divoky; Michael Horton
    Date: 1995
    Source: In: Ralph, C. John; Hunt, George L., Jr.; Raphael, Martin G.; Piatt, John F., Technical Editors. 1995. Ecology and conservation of the Marbled Murrelet. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-152. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 83-88
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (50 KB)

    Description

    Evidence of breeding and natal dispersal in alcids is typically provided by the resightings of banded birds, the establishment of new colonies, and/or evidence of immigration to established colonies. The difficulties in banding, observing, and censusing Marbled Murrelets at nesting areas preclude using any of these methods for this species. Based on the limited number of nests observed in consecutive breeding seasons, breeding site fidelity (birds breeding in the same nest as the previous year) may be lower than most other alcids. This is likely due to low breeding success associated with high levels of nest predation. By contrast, annual use of nest stands suggests fidelity to a nesting area may be high. Natal dispersal, the breeding at locations away from their fledging site, is likely similar to that of other alcids. Loss or degradation of previously occupied nesting habitat will result in the displaced breeders prospecting for new nest sites. In areas with no unoccupied available habitat, this could result in birds being prevented from breeding, attempting breeding in suboptimal habitat, or increasing the distance dispersed from the previous breeding sites. Each of these is likely to result in a decrease in reproductive output. Dispersal patterns need to be considered when assessing the importance of stands and the status of populations. The small population size and fragmented nature of the remaining breeding habitat could increase the time required for prospecting birds to locate recently matured old-growth forest, resulting in underestimating the importance of a stand. Additionally, birds could be dispersing from regions of high production of young to areas with low production but where recruitment opportunities are higher, partially hiding the low reproduction of the latter population.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to psw_communications@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Divoky, George J.; Horton, Michael. 1995. Chapter 7: Breeding and Natal Dispersal, Nest Habitat Loss and Implications for Marbled Murrelet Populations. In: Ralph, C. John; Hunt, George L., Jr.; Raphael, Martin G.; Piatt, John F., Technical Editors. 1995. Ecology and conservation of the Marbled Murrelet. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-152. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 83-88

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/27889