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    Author(s): Vladimir Douhovnikoff; Richard S. Dodd
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 65-72
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (158 KB)

    Description

    Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) is one of the rare conifers to reproduce successfully through clonal spread. The importance of this mode of reproduction in stand development is largely unknown. Understanding the importance of clonal spread and the spatial structure of clones is crucial for stand management strategies that would aim to maximize genetic diversity. We have developed genetic markers to identify the clonal structure of nine second-growth redwood stands in Jackson Demonstration State Forest, California. Clonal spread was found to be important in the development of these stands, with an average of 6.7 stems being assigned as ramets of the same genet. Although fairy ring structures were commonly identified, we also detected a range of other spatial structures in these second-growth redwood stands. We also detected mixed genets within perceived fairy rings. The extent of clones and their spatial structure may have important evolutionary implications and will also have important consequences on effective population sizes for management purposes. Management and conservation of redwoods will benefit from a better understanding of the dynamics and structure of clonal spread in these forests.

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    Citation

    Douhovnikoff, Vladimir; Dodd, Richard S. 2007. Clonal Spread in Second Growth Stands of Coast Redwood, Sequoia sempervirens. In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 65-72

    Keywords

    AFLPs, clonal spread, genet, molecular markers, ramet, Sequoia sempervirens, spatial structure, woody plant

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/28246