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    Author(s): Teresa Sholars; Clare Golec
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 185-200
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (299 KB)

    Description

    Coast redwood forests are predominantly a timber managed habitat type, subjected to repeated disturbances and short rotation periods. What does this repeated disturbance mean for rare plants associated with the redwood forests? Rare plant persistence through forest management activities is influenced by many factors. Persistence of rare plants in a managed landscape is not in itself an indication of viability, but may reflect an overall increase, equilibrium, or decline in numbers. Although the persistence of some species can seemingly mimic weedy behavior, it is important to distinguish pioneer species behavior from the weedy behavior of invasive exotics. Individual species will have different responses to disturbance based on their life history and habitat requirements, as well as the type, intensity, and frequency of disturbance. Human disturbance and natural disturbance regimes are frequently and mistakenly viewed as equivalent. In addition, human disturbance regimes commonly create habitat opportunities for invasive exotics that readily out-compete rare plants for habitat. Knowing why rare plants persist in the managed redwood forest is dependent on understanding their distribution, habitat, life history, and sensitivity to disturbance. This paper will examine forest management effects on 10 rare species of the redwood forest.

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    Citation

    Sholars, Teresa; Golec, Clare. 2007. Rare Plants of the Redwood Forest and Forest Management Effects. In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 185-200

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