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    Author(s): Thomas M. Mahony; John D. Stuart
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 207-214
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (71 KB)

    Description

    Vegetation classifications, based primarily on physiognomic variability and canopy dominants and derived principally from remotely sensed imagery, have been completed for the entire redwood range (Eyre 1980, Fox 1989). However, systematic, quantitative, floristic-based vegetation classifications in old-growth redwood forests have not been completed for large portions of redwood’s range. Quantitative classifications have been completed in portions of the northern (Atzet and Wheeler 1984, Becking 1967, Jimerson and Jones 2000, Lenihan 1986, Mahony 1999a, Mahony and Stuart 2000, Matthews 1986, Mendonca4), and extreme southern portion of redwood’s range (Becking 1971, Borchert and others 1988). With the exception of very limited sampling in Marin and San Mateo Counties by Keeler-Wolf and others (2003), no quantitative classifications have been published for the central and much of the southern portion of redwood’s range. Vegetation classifications are most useful if classification units are spatially represented on maps, but this is often difficult using standard remote sensing techniques. Vegetation modeling is one technique which may allow vegetation classification units to be mapped. Mahony (1999b) developed a predictive model for a portion of the northern redwood range based on a quantitative, floristic-based vegetation classification, discriminant analysis, and a Geographic Information System. Based on field verification, the model was 75 percent accurate.

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    Citation

    Mahony, Thomas M.; Stuart, John D. 2007. Status of Vegetation Classification in Redwood Ecosystems. In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 207-214

    Keywords

    old-growth, redwood, vegetation classification, vegetation modeling

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/28261