Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Bradley E. Valentine; Richard A. Macedo; Tracie Hughes
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 247-256
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (374 KB)

    Description

    Demand for wood products and advances in logging technology post-World War II resulted in timber harvesting that extensively modified streams on the North Coast of California. To assess the resulting impacts to salmonid populations, the Department of Fish and Game conducted studies at widely spaced sites throughout the redwood region during the 1960s. In order to compare current salmonid communities with those documented earlier, we resumed investigations on the South Fork, Caspar Creek in 1993. During the last decade, total salmonid density was within the range observed during the 1960s, albeit generally in the lower half of that prior range. Biomass has remained consistent between the time periods. The salmonid communities shifted from ones in which coho salmon and steelhead were both well represented to ones that were greatly dominated by one species or the other. Stream surface area and substrate quality between the two time periods are similar. Explaining the cause of the different salmonid community patterns between time periods are problematic but is probably related to climatic differences in ocean conditions and precipitation patterns. Because there was a single, early summer pretreatment assessment of salmonids, the long-term effects of the 1960s era timber operations can not be determined.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to psw_communications@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Valentine, Bradley E.; Macedo, Richard A.; Hughes, Tracie. 2007. Salmonid Communities in the South Fork of Caspar Creek, 1967 to 1969 and 1993 to 2003. In: Standiford, Richard B.; Giusti, Gregory A.; Valachovic, Yana; Zielinski, William J.; Furniss, Michael J., technical editors. 2007. Proceedings of the redwood region forest science symposium: What does the future hold? Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-194. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 247-256

    Keywords

    coho, dominance, salmonid community, steelhead, timber harvest

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page
https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/28269