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    Author(s): Thomas L. EberhardtKaren G. Reed
    Date: 2005
    Source: In: Proceedings of 59th Appita annual conference and exhibition incorporating 13th ISWFPC (International Symposium on Wood, Fibre, and Pulping Chemistry). Carlton, Victoria, Australia: Appita: 109-113
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (204 KB)

    Description

    Prior efforts to incorporate bark or bark extracts into composites have met with only limited success because of poor performance relative to existing products and/or economic barriers stemming from high levels of processing. We are currently investigating applications for southern yellow pine (SYP) bark that require intermediate levels of processing, one being the use of carefully ground and classified SYP bark as plywood adhesive fillers. Results can be used to select bark fractions having lower levels of ash. In addition, bark fractions rich in periderm tissue appear to perform better as plywood adhesive fillers relative to that prepared from whole bark.

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    Citation

    Eberhardt, Thomas L.; Reed, Karen G. 2005. Grinding and classification of pine bark for use as plywood adhesive filler. In: Proceedings of 59th Appita annual conference and exhibition incorporating 13th ISWFPC (International Symposium on Wood, Fibre, and Pulping Chemistry). Carlton, Victoria, Australia: Appita: 109-113

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