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    Author(s): J.R. Barrow; M. Lucero; P. Osuna-Avila; I. Reyes-Vera; R.E. Aaltonen
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Sosebee, Ronald E.; Wester, David B.; Britton, Carlton M.; McArthur, E. Durant; Kitchen, Stanley G., comps. Proceedings: Shrubland dynamics -- fire and water; 2004 August 10-12; Lubbock, TX. Proceedings RMRS-P-47. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 123-131.
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (620 B)

    Description

    Symbiotic fungi confer multiple benefits such as enhanced photosynthetic rates and drought tolerance in host plants. Shrubs and grasses of southwestern deserts are colonized by symbiotic fungi that cannot be removed by conventional sterilization methods. These fungi were extensively studied in Bouteloua eriopoda (Torr.) Torr. and Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt. over a wide range of locations and environmental conditions. Fungi were intrinsically integrated with cells, tissues, and regenerated plant cultures. These composite plantfungus organisms are comprised of more than one fungal species. Fungal association with photosynthetic cells and accumulation of lipids provide evidence for carbon management. Fungal biofilms that coat cells, tissues, roots, and leaves suggests protection of plants from direct exposure to stressed environments. Associations with vascular tissues suggests a role in resource transport. Association with stomata indicates an influence in gas exchange, photosynthesis, and evapo-transpiration. Transfer of fungal endophytes from native plants to non-host plants resulted in substantial modifications in root, shoot morphology and biomass, chlorophyll content, and fruiting. Host plants are modified by fungi at the genetic, cellular, and physiological level and positively enhance ecological fitness.

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    Citation

    Barrow, J.R.; Lucero, M.; Osuna-Avila, P.; Reyes-Vera, I.; Aaltonen, R.E. 2007. Fungal genomes that influence basic physiological processes of black grama and fourwing saltbush in arid southwestern rangelands. In: Sosebee, Ronald E.; Wester, David B.; Britton, Carlton M.; McArthur, E. Durant; Kitchen, Stanley G., comps. Proceedings: Shrubland dynamics -- fire and water; 2004 August 10-12; Lubbock, TX. Proceedings RMRS-P-47. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 123-131.

    Keywords

    wildland shrubs, fire, water, symbiotic fungi, fungal genomes, black grama, fourwing saltbush, Bouteloua eriopoda (Torr.) Torr., Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt.

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