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    Author(s): Gerald E. Snow
    Date: 1991
    Source: In: Standiford, Richard B., tech. coord. 1991. Proceedings of the symposium on oak woodlands and hardwood rangeland management; October 31 - November 2, 1990; Davis, California. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-126. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 360-365
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (506 KB)

    Description

    Over 2,000 acorns of Quercus agrifolia (coast live oak) and over 500 acorns of Q. engelmannii (Engelmann oak) were collected in the Jim Knight pasture area of the Santa Rosa Plateau. These were used to test for temperature and moisture conditions on germination of viable acorns in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. At 24°C Q. engelmannii had almost 90 percent germination after 6 days, while Q. agrifolia had about 20 percent (96 percent after 20 days). At 14°C completeness and speed of germination of Q. engelmannii was reduced to about 80 percent after 36 days, while Q. agrifolia had over 90 percent at 30 days. At 4°C Q. engelmannii had about 60 percent germination at 72 days, while Q. agrifolia had over 90 percent at 72 days. At varying degrees of moisture stress from field capacity to -100 bar atmosphere (at 20°C) Q. engelmannii had at least 70 percent germination of viable acorns after 36 days, while Q. agrifolia did not germinate in a-100 bar atmosphere, reached complete germination in a -10 bar PEG-vermiculite mixture after 60 days and took 132 days for complete germination under 100 percent relative humidity conditions. Drying (20°C, 45 percent RH) acorns for up to 3 weeks with 24 percent moisture loss had no effect on Q. engelmannii but Q. agrifolia lost 42,58 and 75 percent of their initial moisture after 1, 2 and 3 weeks drying and all the seeds were dead after 2 weeks. The "self-rooting" of Q. engelmannii is also discussed. These germination characteristics are related to the distribution of these two oak species in the field.

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    Citation

    Snow, Gerald E. 1991. Germination Characteristics of Engelmann Oak and Coast Live Oak from the Santa Rosa Plateau, Riverside County, California. In: Standiford, Richard B., tech. coord. 1991. Proceedings of the symposium on oak woodlands and hardwood rangeland management; October 31 - November 2, 1990; Davis, California. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-126. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 360-365

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