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    Author(s): Stanley L. Krugman
    Date: 1966
    Source: Res. Paper PSW-RP-37. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture; 5 p
    Publication Series: Research Paper (RP)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (260 KB)

    Description

    An anatomical study of ovule and conelet development was made on about 200 developing conelets in a plantation in the central Sierra Nevada of California, after an unseasonal April frost. Night temperatures as low as -6° C. were recorded. Conelets in pollination bags were most susceptible to cold damage; emerging conelets were the most badly damaged; conelets at maximum were only slightly damaged. Low temperatures did not affect final seed set of the surviving cones.

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    Citation

    Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Res. Paper PSW-RP-37. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Forest & Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture; 5 p

    Keywords

    Knobcone pine, conelets, freezing temperature

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