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    Author(s): Darrell W. Ross; Gary E. Daterman; Jerry L. Boughton; Thomas M. Quigley
    Date: 2001
    Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-523. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 38 p
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Northwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (579 KB)

    Description

    A spruce beetle outbreak of unprecedented size and intensity killed most of the spruce trees on millions of acres of forest land in south-central Alaska in the 1990s. The tree mortality is affecting every component of the ecosystem, including the socioeconomic culture dependent on the resources of these vast forests. Based on information obtained through workshops and outreach to resource managers and diverse stakeholders, we have developed priority issues for restoring the land. Wildfire is a major issue, particularly for the wildland-urban interface areas around Anchorage and on the Kenai A spruce beetle outbreak of unprecedented size and intensity killed most of the spruce trees on millions of acres of forest land in south-central Alaska in the 1990s. The tree mortality is affecting every component of the ecosystem, including the socioeconomic culture dependent on the resources of these vast forests. Based on information obtained through workshops and outreach to resource managers and diverse stakeholders, we have developed priority issues for restoring the land. Wildfire is a major issue, particularly for the wildland-urban interface areas around Anchorage and on the Kenai Peninsula. The tasks of land managers are integrative and multidisciplinary and involve many science-related issues. They primarily revolve around the problem of how to reduce risk of wildfire and ensure reforestation in ways that will accommodate the needs for wildlife habitat, maintain healthy hydrologic conditions, and generally conserve ecological values for the future. The research approach outlines a “what if” scenario of management options based on levels of investment and targets for restoration. Modeling and visualization research would provide previews of future conditions based on levels of investment, selected landscapes, and the desired conditions selected among restoration options.

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    Citation

    Ross, Darrell W.; Daterman, Gary E.; Boughton, Jerry L.; Quigley, Thomas M. 2001. Forest health restoration in south-central Alaska: a problem analysis. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-523. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 38 p

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    Keywords

    Ecosystem health, forest health, ecosystem restoration, Alaska, south-central Alaska, wildfire, spruce beetle, wildlife habitat, hydrology, urban forestry

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