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    Author(s): Zhiyong CaiJerrold E. Winandy
    Date: 2006
    Source: Proceedings of the 8th Pacific Rim Bio-Based Composites Symposium, Advances and Challenges in Biocomposites : 20-23 November, 2006, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Kepong, Malaysia : Forest Research Institute Malaysia, c2006: ISBN: 9832181879: 9789832181873: Pages 42-47
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (10 MB)

    Description

    Efficient and economical utilization of various bio-based materials is an effective way to improve forest management, promote long-term sustainability, and restore native ecosystems. However, the dilemma is how to deal with lesser used, undervalued or no-value bio-resources such as small diameter trees, agricultural residues (wheat straw, rice straw, and corn stalk), exotic-invasive species, recycled biofibers, and hazardous fuels and residues from fire-prone forests. This paper will present results from a number of research projects that have been conducted at USDA Forest Service, Forest Product Laboratory (FPL). The results provide new alternatives on how to utilize small-diameter curve trees for laminated structural lumber, fiber from exotic-invasive species in wood-plastic composites, bio-fibers for new engineered fiberboard products, and even mixing wood fiber with chicken-feather fiber to create more moisture-resistant medium density fiberboard (MDF). This paper will review on-going research on developing new bio-based composites derived from a series of diverse and underappreciated wood- and bio-fiber resources. Because removal of non-indigenous shrubby exotic-invasive species is expensive, to help off-set the economic costs associated with these removals and to re-introduce indigenous ecosystems in the United States, scientists at FPL are actively working on engineering and economic feasibility and process development for using these bio-fibers in wood-plastic composites. Chicken feather fiber may offer a large, economical fiber resource as an additive for MDF; a study has been completed to evaluate the properties of MDF prepared by using a series of chicken feather fiber and aspen wood fiber mixtures. A new process for utilizing low-grade or curved material has been developed and tested for engineering and economic feasibility. Parts of that process have recently been commercialized.

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Cai, Zhiyong; Winandy, Jerrold E. 2006. Opportunities for using bio-based fibers for value-added composites. Proceedings of the 8th Pacific Rim Bio-Based Composites Symposium, Advances and Challenges in Biocomposites : 20-23 November, 2006, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Kepong, Malaysia : Forest Research Institute Malaysia, c2006: ISBN: 9832181879: 9789832181873: Pages 42-47

    Keywords

    Fiberboard, feathers, biomass, utilization, wood plastic composites, sustainable forestry, economic aspects, composite materials, value added, building materials, renewable natural resources, small-diameter timber, smallwood, wood-plastic materials, biocomposites

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/28813