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    Author(s): J.M. Warren; F.C. Meinzer; J.R. Brooks; J.-C. Domec; R. Coulombe
    Date: 2006
    Source: New Phytologist. 173: 753-765
    Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
    PDF: View PDF  (2.55 MB)

    Description

    We incorporated soil/plant biophysical properties into a simple model to predict seasonal trajectories of hydraulic redistribution (HR). We measured soil water content, water potential root conductivity, and climate across multiple years in two old-growth coniferous forests. The HR variability within sites (0 to 0.5 mm/d) was linked to spatial patterns of roots, soil moisture, and climate. The HR seasonally accounted for up to 9 percent of daily water use, peaking at 0.16 mm/d (ponderosa pine) or 0.30 mm/d(Douglas-fir), then declining as modeled pathway conductance dropped with increasing root cavitation. Patterns of HR were attributed to variability in water potential gradients and conductivity within the root system.

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    Citation

    Warren, J.M.; Meinzer, F.C.; Brooks, J.R.; Domec, J.-C.; Coulombe, R. 2006. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water in two old-growth coniferous forests: quantifying patterns and controls. New Phytologist. 173: 753-765

    Keywords

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), hydraulic lift, hydraulic redistribution, ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), root conductivity, soil water content, water potential

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