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    Author(s): Everett Hansen
    Date: 2008
    Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp 5-14
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (101 KB)

    Description

    It was the second week of June, 2000, the hottest weather on record in San Francisco - hardly Phytophthora weather. But it was that week, at China Camp State Park, that Dave Rizzo and colleagues collected the bark samples from bleeding cankers on coast live oaks that finally moved sudden oak death (SOD) from the “cause unknown” category to “Phytophthora disease” (Rizzo and others 2002). Research progress has been dramatic in the last seven years. Think of the advances in Phytophthora genetics, capped by publication of the complete genome sequence, and its applications in diagnostics and population genetics. Think of the discovery of other Phytophthora species with similar life styles to Phytophthora ramorum, but apparently indigenous to the same forests. This was unexpected, and is stimulating a resurgence in Phytophthora taxonomy worldwide. Think of the substantial efforts in nursery disease research to understand the spread and survival of P. ramorum in this intensely manipulated environment that are leading to development of “best management practices,” and fewer and fewer infested nurseries. It would be reasonable, and comforting, to use this time at the beginning of this Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium to reflect on our past accomplishments. They are many. But somehow I find myself more impressed with the challenges of the future. I want to highlight some of the new and exciting work to be presented at this meeting, work that is opening new research directions, and to consider the daunting and escalating management challenges that this disease is forcing on us.

    Publication Notes

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    Citation

    Hansen, Everett. 2008. Rethinking phytophthora—research opportunities and management. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp 5-14

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