Skip to Main Content
U.S. Forest Service
Caring for the land and serving people

United States Department of Agriculture

Home > Search > Publication Information

  1. Share via EmailShare on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on Twitter
    Dislike this pubLike this pub
    Author(s): Y. Balci; S. Balci; W.L. MacDonald; K.W. Gottschalk
    Date: 2008
    Source: In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 225-226
    Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (142 KB)

    Description

    Pathogenicity of seven Phytophthora species was assessed by inoculation of stem and foliar tissues of oak species (Quercus spp.) native to the eastern United States. Phytophthora cambivora, P. cinnamomi, P. citricola, P. europaea, P. quercina ?like?, P. sp1 and P. sp2 were inoculated into stems of 1-year-old greenhouse seedlings and 2-year-old oaks grown under field conditions. Stem inoculations were conducted for 2-month periods in June and September (summer inoculation) and in October-December (fall inoculation). Stem inoculation was conducted by inserting an agar plug containing mycelium on a U-shaped wound, made aseptically about 3 cm above the root collar. Oak species used for 1-year-old stem inoculations included Q. bicolor, Q. macrocarpa, Q. montana, Q. palustris, and Q rubra; 2-year-old seedlings included Q. alba, Q. montana, Q. palustris, Q. rubra and Q. velutina. Leaf inoculations also were conducted using oak and understory plant species to evaluate the ability of the Phytophthora species to infect foliar tissue. These tests included foliage of the six oak species that were tested as part of the stem inoculation experiments and foliage of Q. alba, Q. imbricara, Q. robur, Castanea dentata, Kalmia latifolia and Rhododendron maximum. Two leaf age categories were used: leaves that were fully developed and up to 3 months in age; and, leaves that were 3 to 6-months old. Wound and non-wounded treatments were applied to each age category.

    Publication Notes

    • You may send email to rmrspubrequest@fs.fed.us to request a hard copy of this publication.
    • (Please specify exactly which publication you are requesting and your mailing address.)
    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Balci, Y.; Balci, S.; MacDonald, W.L.; Gottschalk, K.W. 2008. Pathogenicity of Phytophthora species isolated from rhizosphere soil in the eastern United States. In: Frankel, Susan J.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M., tech. coords. 2008. Proceedings of the sudden oak death third science symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-214. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. pp. 225-226

    Keywords

    Phytophthora species, oaks, pathogenicity

    Related Search


    XML: View XML
Show More
Show Fewer
Jump to Top of Page