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    Author(s): F. N. SCATENA
    Date: 2004
    Source: River Res. Applic. 20: 127–135 ()
    Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
    PDF: View PDF  (149 B)

    Description

    To evaluate the current status of instream flow practices in streams that drain into the Caribbean Basin, a voluntary survey of practising water resource managers was conducted. Responses were received from 70% of the potential continental countries, 100% of the islands in the Greater Antilles, and 56% of all the Caribbean island nations. Respondents identified ‘effluent discharges’, ‘downstream water quality’ and ‘existing extraction permits’ to be the most common sources of instream flow conflicts. In 75% of the countries, some type of ‘formal procedures’ exist for reviewing permit applications for freshwater extraction. In 82% of the countries, effluent discharge permits state the amount of effluent that can be discharged into a water body while only 69% require that surface water extraction permits explicitly state the quantity of water that can be extracted. In setting instream flow requirements, record low flow is used over 83% of the time. Freshwater fish were identified as the most important aquatic organism but no country ‘always’ considers the ecology or habitat requirements of aquatic species in their instream flow determinations and nearly 70% of the respondents indicated that multivariate, ecological-based methods are ‘never’ used in their country. Survey responses also indicate there is a notable lack of public involvement during the issuing of water permits. Moreover, over 80% of the countries do not provide public announcements or hearings during the permit process. In summary, this survey indicates that while there is a widespread recognition of the need for instream flows, there is a general lack of regionally based information and public involvement regarding stream flow determination. Published in

    Publication Notes

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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    SCATENA, F. N. 2004. A SURVEY OF METHODS FOR SETTING MINIMUM INSTREAM FLOW STANDARDS IN THE CARIBBEAN BASIN. River Res. Applic. 20: 127–135 ()

    Keywords

    rivers, instream flow methodologies, Caribbean

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