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    Author(s): J. Oscar Blew
    Date: 1965
    Source: Research note FPL no. 085. Madison, WI : USDA, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory. 12 pages.
    Publication Series: Research Note (RN)
    Station: Forest Products Laboratory
    PDF: View PDF  (250 KB)

    Description

    With all the favorable properties that contribute to its wide use in farming, wood nevertheless needs to be used intelligently, and protected from certain natural enemies. For example, while some species of wood are naturally resistant to attack by decay fungi and harmful insects, most species lack adequate resistance when exposed to attack, This is not serious when wood can be kept dry and away from contact with the ground. However, for such farm uses as fencing, poles, bridges, culverts, irrigation structures, silos, storage sheds, barns, and some types of vehicles, wood must be used in contact with moisture; it is thereby subject to decay and, in some areas, to termite attack. Fortunately, this can be corrected by preservative treatment.

    Publication Notes

    • We recommend that you also print this page and attach it to the printout of the article, to retain the full citation information.
    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.

    Citation

    Blew, J. Oscar 1965. Preservative treatment of wood for farm use. Research note FPL no. 085. Madison, WI : USDA, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory. 12 pages.

    Keywords

    Farms, fuels, tools, agriculture, decay, preservatives, shelter, termites, oilborne preservatives, waterborne salts

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