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    Author(s): Donald T. Gordon
    Date: 1979
    Source: Res. Paper. PSW-140. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. 14 p
    Publication Series: Research Paper (RP)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.74 MB)

    Description

    In stands of mixed white and red fir in northeastern California, cuttings for natural regeneration became well stocked with seedlings within 2 to 5 years after cutting. Seed tree and shelterwood cuttings, clearcut strips not more than 3 chains (60 m) wide, and patches not exceeding 4 chains (80 m) width were studied. Incidence of damage among residual trees in or adjacent to cuttings was negligible. Low vegetation developed slowly and did not appear to affect seedling survival.

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    Citation

    Gordon, Donald T. 1979. Successful natural regeneration cuttings in California true firs. Res. Paper. PSW-140. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. 14 p

    Keywords

    cutting methods, slash disposal, seedbed preparation, damage, seedling stocking, seed, white fir, red fir, Swain Mountain Experimental Forest, natural regeneration

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