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    Author(s): Henry W. Anderson
    Date: 1972
    Source: Res. Note PSW-RN-268. Berkeley, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 4 p
    Publication Series: Research Note (RN)
    Station: Pacific Southwest Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (514 KB)

    Description

    Recovery from flood-accelerated sedimentation affects both estimates of long-term average deposition and short-term monitoring of changes. "Years to return to normal" for 10 watersheds in northern California after a major flood accelerated sediment concentrations were analyzed. Returns to normalcy took from 0 to 9 years; rate of decline was related to both amount of initial acceleration by the flood and differences in watersheds. years to recovery increased with these four factors: coefficient of path lengths in the watershed, area of poor logging, area of steep grassland, and percent of area in sedimentary rock types Cenozoic or younger.

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    Citation

    Anderson, Henry W. 1972. Major floods, poor land use delay return of sedimentation to normal rates. Res. Note PSW-RN-268. Berkeley, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 4 p

    Keywords

    watershed management, forest management, streamflow, logging effects, floods, sediment transport, sedimentation, water quality, forecasting

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