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    Author(s): Gary Bryner
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Watson, Alan; Sproull, Janet; Dean, Liese, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Eighth World Wilderness Congress symposium; September 30-October 6, 2005; Anchorage, AK. Proceedings RMRS-P-49. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 273-280
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (285 B)

    Description

    Although wilderness designations require congressional action, state-level political decisions usually determine whether and when Congress formally acts to designate new wilderness areas. In some cases, such as in Alaska, the issue of wilderness protection becomes nationalized and a wide range of interests beyond the borders of the state shape the eventual policy. But in most states, the fate of wilderness proposals is largely a function of local economic, political, and ecological issues and concerns. While the issues are different in each state, there is great value in comparing the experience of efforts across the states in securing protection for wilderness areas to see how the experience in some states can illuminate efforts in others. Why have some states been successful in getting wilderness areas protected by Congress, and other states have not? What can states where wilderness proposals languish learn from others who have been successful in getting legislation enacted? What factors contribute to successful wilderness campaigns and what causes failures? What kinds of economic analyses, ecological assessments and other scientific studies are most useful in wilderness policy making? How have wilderness proponents been able to generate the kind of political support required for action? The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for exploring answers to these questions by examining wilderness designation efforts in the western states during the past several decades.

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    Citation

    Bryner, Gary. 2007. Designating wilderness areas: A framework for examining lessons from the States. In: Watson, Alan; Sproull, Janet; Dean, Liese, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Eighth World Wilderness Congress symposium; September 30-October 6, 2005; Anchorage, AK. Proceedings RMRS-P-49. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 273-280

    Keywords

    wilderness, biodiversity, protected areas, economics, subsistence, tourism, traditional knowledge, community involvement, policy, stewardship, education, spiritual values

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/31041