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    Author(s): John Shultis
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Watson, Alan; Sproull, Janet; Dean, Liese, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Eighth World Wilderness Congress symposium; September 30-October 6, 2005; Anchorage, AK. Proceedings RMRS-P-49. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 496-500
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (255 B)

    Description

    The phrase ‘May you live in interesting times’ links well with the sub-discipline of landscape ecology. Recent research in landscape ecology and associated disciplines (for example, conservation biology) provides significant challenges to the traditional conceptions of wilderness and conservation science, and may in part reflect upon our view of contemporary society as being characterized by complexity and uncertainty. Four selected implications of landscape ecology research for wilderness advocates and managers are identified and described. These issues relate to the importance of ecological processes in ecosystem functioning, the existence of multiple spatial and temporal scales in landscapes, the integration of the natural and social realms, and unpredictability and lack of understanding of ecological patterns and processes. While there are many ramifications of these four issues for wilderness conservation, there are also broader implications of landscape ecology’s conceptualization of nature and conservation. A parallel movement in conceptualizing society and nature as self-organizing systems characterized by disturbance and complexity in the natural and social sciences is also discussed. Both these disciplinary and transdisciplinary findings will significantly affect the social functions and management of wilderness in the future.

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    Citation

    Shultis, John. 2007. Living in interesting times: Selected implications of landscape ecology for conservation science. In: Watson, Alan; Sproull, Janet; Dean, Liese, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Eighth World Wilderness Congress symposium; September 30-October 6, 2005; Anchorage, AK. Proceedings RMRS-P-49. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 496-500

    Keywords

    wilderness, biodiversity, protected areas, economics, subsistence, tourism, traditional knowledge, community involvement, policy, stewardship, education, spiritual values

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