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    Author(s): Kevin Kiernan
    Date: 2007
    Source: In: Watson, Alan; Sproull, Janet; Dean, Liese, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Eighth World Wilderness Congress symposium; September 30-October 6, 2005; Anchorage, AK. Proceedings RMRS-P-49. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 519-525
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (375 B)

    Description

    Geodiversity values involve aspects of the abiotic environment that are sometimes the dominant element that imparts scenic and wilderness value, are scientifically important in their own right, and almost invariably form the essential habitat for the biodiversity that is often the main target of modern conservation policies. Given this dominance of the physical landscape over other aspects of wilderness character, the potential for restoration of degraded wilderness depends foremost on the significance and resilience of the landforms and the capacity for them to recover over an acceptable time frame. The contradiction between the expectations that wilderness is in pristine natural condition, should be available for recreational use, yet is devoid of artificial intervention in natural processes must also be addressed. This challenge looms increasingly large in a world in which virtually all wilderness areas now face anthropogenic climate change that is increasingly distorting natural processes. This paper illustrates a geomorphological approach to assessing wilderness restoration prospects by presenting a case study of potential restoration of the original Lake Pedder, a scenic glacial lake that was widely regarded as both the heart and crown jewel of the Tasmanian wilderness prior to its inundation beneath a large hydro-electric reservoir in the early 1970s. The applicability of this approach to assessing potential wilderness restoration endeavours elsewhere is discussed.

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    Citation

    Kiernan, Kevin. 2007. Some practical considerations in restoration of wilderness geodiversity: Insights from Lake Pedder, Tasmania. In: Watson, Alan; Sproull, Janet; Dean, Liese, comps. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Eighth World Wilderness Congress symposium; September 30-October 6, 2005; Anchorage, AK. Proceedings RMRS-P-49. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 519-525

    Keywords

    wilderness, biodiversity, protected areas, economics, subsistence, tourism, traditional knowledge, community involvement, policy, stewardship, education, spiritual values

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/31079