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    Author(s): Corey A. Moffet; J. Bret Taylor; D. Terrance Booth
    Date: 2008
    Source: In: Kitchen, Stanley G.; Pendleton, Rosemary L.; Monaco, Thomas A.; Vernon, Jason, comps. 2008. Proceedings-Shrublands under fire: disturbance and recovery in a changing world; 2006 June 6-8; Cedar City, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-52. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 161-168
    Publication Series: Proceedings (P)
    Station: Rocky Mountain Research Station
    PDF: View PDF  (1.2 MB)

    Description

    Very large scale aerial (VLSA) imagery is an efficient tool for monitoring bare ground and cover on extensive rangelands. This study was conducted to determine whether VLSA images could be used to detect differences in antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata Pursh DC) cover and density among similar ecological sites with varying postfire recovery periods. In 2005, VLSA images were acquired at 253 points from high bitterbrush potential ecological sites at the USDA-ARS, U.S. Sheep Experiment Station, Dubois, Idaho. For each image, fire history was classified and bitterbrush density and cover were measured. Bitterbrush cover in images with no recorded history of fire during the previous 68 yr (22 percent of all images) was 1.71 percent and density was 875 plant ha?1. Areas with postfire recovery interval between 10 and 68 yr (60 percentage of all images) had bitterbrush density (587 plant ha?1) and cover (1.23 percent) that were not different (α = 0.05) from areas with no fire history. Images with postfire recovery interval less than 7 yr (18 percent of all images) exhibited less bitterbrush cover (0.49 percent) and density (263 plant ha?1). These results are consistent with other studies of postfire bitterbrush recovery in eastern Idaho and indicate that analysis of VLSA imagery is an effective method for evaluating the impact of fire history on bitterbrush recovery.

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    Citation

    Moffet, Corey A.; Taylor, J. Bret; Booth, D. Terrance. 2008. Very Large Scale Aerial (VLSA) imagery for assessing postfire bitterbrush recovery. In: Kitchen, Stanley G.; Pendleton, Rosemary L.; Monaco, Thomas A.; Vernon, Jason, comps. 2008. Proceedings-Shrublands under fire: disturbance and recovery in a changing world; 2006 June 6-8; Cedar City, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-52. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 161-168

    Keywords

    wildland shrubs, disturbance, recovery, fire, invasive plants, restoration, ecology, microorganisms

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https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/31320